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The Accountant's simple math

Oh, the Affleckism of it all.

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Math on a pane of glass, classic.
  • Math on a pane of glass, classic.

Ben Affleck is The Accountant in The Accountant, but he’s not just any accountant—he’s one with high-functioning autism, several aliases, an Airstream full of stolen fine art and literally killer hand-to-hand combat skills. (Shades of...Jason Bourne?) In The Accountant, a ridiculous yet entertaining action movie that’s at least aimed at adults, Affleck’s Christian Wolff is hired by John Lithgow to find 60 million missing dollars, as discovered by Anna Kendrick in a pointless Girl Part that she brings her genial charm and earnestness to with the usual pluckiness. But Lithgow didn’t want him to discover it, of course, and now a bunch of dudes are trying to kill him, just as the US treasury department, led by JK Simmons, is closing in too. Quite the pickle, but you would never know from Affleck’s face, which makes the side of beef Rocky used to punch look like Julianne Moore, expression-wise. He manages to wring a bit of levity out of Wolff—to its minor credit, this movie does not take itself too seriously, despite its sloppily weaved-in brotherly love crap—and clearly made this after Batman, making for one jacked nerd assassin. It’s nice to see Jean Smart as Lithgow’s sister—the dominant Designing Woman has always been Annie Potts—and Jeffrey Tambor also pops up, but this whole thing is a showcase for the Affleckism of it all. At least it wasn’t Jeremy Renner?

Related Film

Official Site: www.accountantmovie.com

Director: Gavin O'Connor

Writer: Bill Dubuque

Producer: Mark Williams and Lynette Howell

Cast: Ben Affleck, Anna Kendrick, J.K. Simmons, Jon Bernthal, Jean Smart, Cynthia Addai-Robinson, Jeffrey Tambor and John Lithgow

Related Film

Official Site: www.accountantmovie.com

Director: Gavin O'Connor

Writer: Bill Dubuque

Producer: Mark Williams and Lynette Howell

Cast: Ben Affleck, Anna Kendrick, J.K. Simmons, Jon Bernthal, Jean Smart, Cynthia Addai-Robinson, Jeffrey Tambor and John Lithgow

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