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Daily Roundup

Friday, August 21, 2015

TGIFinally Friday's 10 knowledge-pockets for you

Murder, Maple Leafs and mayor Mike's trip to virtual reality.

Posted By on Fri, Aug 21, 2015 at 4:37 PM

Maybe the old St. Pat's High School has to be torn down because there was no market for the Wr ter's its kshop produced. - VIA LINDA GAUDET ON INSTAGRAM
  • Maybe the old St. Pat's High School has to be torn down because there was no market for the Wr ter's its kshop produced.
  • via Linda Gaudet on Instagram

1
William Michael Sandeson has been charged in with 1st-degree murder in the death of his fellow Dalhousie student Taylor Samson. Court documents from police claim Samson had been selling marijuana for extra cash, and was supposed to meet a new customer with a large order when he disappeared on Saturday.

Samson's friend, the same one who told his mother he left to meet a new client, told police Samson was nervous about going to meet the new client and tried to get someone to go with him to the alleged drug deal, however no one was available.

"Samson seemed nervous about it since it was four pounds, a larger amount of marijuana than usual," according to court documents.

The documents also say that police believed Samson was the victim of a “drug rip.”

“I have been advised by...confidential sources that ‘drug rips’ and cash robberies take place often; rarely reported to police,” said Det. Const. Jen Lake in the search warrant.

There was some discussion on social media yesterday about whether this story would be reported similarly if Samson and Sandeson were two black men from North Preston in a drug deal gone bad. Probably, though certainly not to the degree of some places. Murder is still a rarity in Halifax. There might not be headlines pushing the student angle so hard. Maybe there’d be less commentary about what a normal, nice young man the accused murderer appeared to be (something some of us have heard from friends, and friends of friends). None of that makes Samson’s death any less tragic, or helps his community be any less pained.

2
The Parker Street Food & Funirture bank desperately needs school supplies to donate to the area’s low-income families. Metro’s Rebecca Dingwell reports the organization already has 500 applicants to their back-to-school program and not nearly enough supplies. Apparently items for the higher grades are the hardest to come by (geometry sets, French/English dictionaries, graph paper) but sounds like anything you can supply would be of help.

3
The Maple Leafs will train for three days this September at the BMO Centre in Bedford, for any masochists who want to buy tickets and get their hopes up.

4
Union leaders: “Liberals’ labour proclamation will damage public services
Chronicle Herald editorial: “New tack sensible in contract talks

5
Replacing the Halifax Rainmen has gone from a hard yes to a soft maybe. Contrary to previous reports, there won’t be a shiny press conference this week announcing a new team backed by a consortium of prominent Halifax businesspeople. Don Mills of Corporate Research Associates is one of the driving forces behind the plans to get basketball back in Halifax. He blames the summer weather—no really—for delaying the deal.

“While he couldn’t give a definitive date for an announcement, Mills hinted a decision needs to be made in the next two weeks before having to abandon the idea.

‘The closer we get to September, the more this year’s season would be in jeopardy, I think, because there’s a lot to be done, obviously, once the capital is in place,’ he said. ‘We’re tight on time, no question.’”

6
Last night, the monthly-ish food fair that is The Coast's Halifax Food Truck Party proved it's a movable feast, leaving the regular Museum of Natural History location to try lovely Dartmouth. And more than 2,500 people came to #hfxfoodtruckparty along the harbour beside King's Wharf, many of them lovely Dartmouthians who'd never even heard of the Halifax event. At The Coast office we're deep in post-party recovery, so can't say anything about what the future may hold concerning the many requests we got to put on a Dartmouth party EVERY WEEK. All we can focus on with confidence is the final FTP of this summer season, September 17 back at the museum.

7
It’s commonly known that reality is garbage. So call us jealous that mayor Mike Savage gets to escape into the vast e-space of the virtual world…

8
“A lot of groups have temples, or churches, for us it’s our witchy shops,” says Put Me On Consignment owner, and witchy woman Pamela McInnis. She’s opening the small and mysterious Neighbourhood With General Store on Queen Street in early September and hopes to fill the void left by longtime Barrington Street resident, Little Mysteries.

9
If you’re wondering where the parade of white-wearing, picnic-basket-carrying peeps is headed tomorrow…it’s a secret! Halifax's second installment of chic-as-hell communal picnic Dîner en Blanc will be gathering upwards of 1,000 Haligonians in various locations around the city Saturday night, before bringing them to an undisclosed glamourous location to dine in style. Potentially in the rain. Inspired by the international event, we had an inelegant backyard picnic. and hope you do the same at some point this weekend. Feel free to wear sweats.

+1 Sure Thing
Tonight at The Dart Gallery catch VERSUS on its opening night. VERSUS is a multidisciplinary art show exploring the concepts of good and evil and the age-old hero/villain dichotomies and conflicts–as told through paintings, prints and even ceramics depicting pop culture characters. If you’re battling hunger at the opening reception, Picnic chef Allan McPherson will be serving up gourmet hot dogs named for popular wrestling heels.

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Friday, August 14, 2015

Friday's 9 things you have to read

Second Cup's troubles, closing beaches, NOFX are jerks

Posted By on Fri, Aug 14, 2015 at 1:11 PM

Quaint as all hell. - BY PATRICKODELL ON INSTAGRAM.

1
More on the closure of the Quinpool Road Second Cup from the Herald’s Remo Zaccagna; it appears property owner Christina Kioussis is owed over $40,000 in unpaid rent from the last year-and-a-half. Zaccagna also digs up an unfair labour board grievance filed late last year that claims franchise owner Kathy Attis never paid the wage rate specified in her Labour Board collective agreement, with the claim stating she “treats the union as if it did not exist, or worse.” Lots more here.

2
The CBC spoke with Isaac J. Hansen about his idea of a merged “Reparative Party” of Canada’s three progressive vote options. Hansen submitted the suggestion in an open letter to Tom Mulcair, Elizabeth May and Justin Trudeau which we published as a Voice of the City in this week’s edition of The Coast. CBC mentions The Coast, but doesn’t link to us. It’s cool, dudes.

3
In the wake of Morgan Wheeldon’s forced resignation as candidate in Kings-Hants, Vice’s James Wilt looks into Thomas Mulcair’s crack-down on pro-Palestinian sentiment in the NDP.

4
The Nova Scotia Nature Trust has bought a 122-hectare “hotbed of biodiversity” in Yarmouth County, permanently protecting its ecosystem. The area is home to 90 species of flora, 11 of which are at risk of extinction in Nova Scotia. The Trust will have a free guided walk of the new lands tomorrow. The Herald has more details.

5
The Coast’s listings editor hit up the Fat Wreck Chords 25th anniversary tour on Monday night and has a lot of conflicting feelings about it. Mostly because NOFX's Fat Mike is kind of a dick.

6
Global’s Julia Wong says HRM beach closures are double last year’s numbers. In newsrooms across the city, “beach closed for swimming” emails are neck-and-neck with “road closed for construction” announcements from HRM.

7
Halifax police are looking to purchase two non-lethal anti-riot launcher weapons, replacing older models the department hasn’t used in two decades.

8
I could really go for a Duo-Double.

Saw this at a market today. Nice try Korea. #copyrightinfringement #timhortons #knockoff

A photo posted by Mike Elgar (@mikeaelgar) on

+1 Sure Thing
Tonight Haligonian-turned-Torontonian rapper Wordburglar releases his album Rapplicable Skills. The Coast’s Adria Young caught up with the word nerd to chat about his new release, its Halifax inspirations and his new comic.

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Thursday, August 13, 2015

Thursday's 7 things to get a read on

Octopi presents, career tips and somehow the Blue Jays.

Posted By on Thu, Aug 13, 2015 at 2:16 PM

Fountain be pretty, y'all. - BY KOOKYLOVE ON INSTAGRAM.
  • Fountain be pretty, y'all.
  • By KookyLove on Instagram.

1
The PEACE EAST festival is six years old this weekend, and organizers Chris Enns and Sherri Reeve-Enns are hoping you’ll check it out. The medical marijuana activists have been fighting the government and the courts since their businesses and home were twice raided by police over the last two years. City editor Jacob Boon sets out in this week’s cover story to clear the air on Canada’s failed drug war.

2
Punctuating the downtown skyline stand the helix-like beaks of several construction cranes. They’re the towering DNA that’s picking up what we’re putting down—building the building blocks of Halifax’s steel skeleton and concrete skin. Why not learn how the heck to become a crane operator and pilot one of these future-makers for yourself? (Also, the pay’s really good.)

3
Isaac Hansen is a graphic designer in Halifax and is sick of this whole Stephen Harper thing. To wit, he’s urging Tom Mulcair, Elizabeth May and Justin Trudeau to come together and unite the left against a Conservative right far too long in power. The dude’s even made a logo for his proposed Reparative Party, too. It’s quite autumnal!

4
Global has a new weather app. Metro redesigned their website.

5
Eastern Passage is hopping mad after HRM gave the businesses and residents along Cow Bay Road less than 24-hours notice that their street was going to be shut down for construction. Same as it ever was.

6
This Sportsnet article about why the Blue Jays are doing so well has nothing to do with Drake but is still very interesting.

+1 Sure Thing
Tonight Octopi Entertainment presents an evening with Kestrels, the Halifax hometown boys currently on a cross-Canada tour in support of their latest EP, The Moon Is Shining Our Way. The indie-pop trio puts on a killer show, pairing presence with skill perfectly. As Kestrels’ star rises, I suggest seeing them now so you can say “I saw them when.”

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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Wednesday's 9 things to read while everyone else is on vacation

Update on Rainmen, Portland Place fire, unconcerned bears.

Posted By on Wed, Aug 12, 2015 at 11:20 AM

VIA FAREN MCD ON INSTAGRAM.

1
A consortium of Halifax business owners and entrepreneurs will back the Rainmen’s replacement. Jonathan Briggins reports that the city’s new basketball team should be announced next week. The Halifax Wooden Monkeys? The Halifax Freds? Only time will tell.

2
The number of prison deaths in Nova Scotia are “disturbing” says Canada’s corrections watchdog. CBC’s Catharine Tunney reports that inmate deaths at Nova Scotia’s federal penitentiaries are the highest they’ve been in at least five years—with two deaths at the Nova Institution for Women and one at the Springhill Institution so far in 2015. Correctional Investigator Howard Sapers tells Tunney that the deaths are “raising some red flags.”

“Really disturbing is two of those deaths involved women who died at the Nova Correctional Institute and last year we had no women die in custody.”

Lots more from CBC here.

3
The Conservatives kicked out Repentigny, Quebec candidate Buddy Ford because he was charged and pled guilty to possessing one single joint in 2011. This came days before Stephen Harper hammered against marijuana reform at a “press conference” yesterday in Markham, Ontario.

Apparently it's that part of the campaign where candidates emerge to step down over past “scandals,” (if you can call them that). The NDP have lost Morgan Wheeldon in Kings-Hants over some pro-Palestine comments he left on Facebook a year ago, while another Conservative candidate in Montreal was removed after having promoted the NDP online in the last year. There was also that dude who was only running as an art project. Notes BJ Siekierski at iPolitics: “It seems the Tories have expended more energy vetting spectators at campaign events than they have screening actual candidates.”

4
The switch to clear bags is so far, so good says Metro’s Stephanie Taylor, who reports the first week-and-a-half of garbage collection has compliance rates of 80 percent. The real test, REgroup general manager Alan Abraham says, will come in the fall when all those students need to learn the new rules.

5
Another 13,000 HRM households will be switched over to community mailboxes on Monday, and the Herald’s Brett Bundale looks at some of the issues around the American-made contraptions. A reminder: community mailboxes suck.

6
Hey, remember that fire that destroyed 5426 Portland Place last September in a giant cloud of smoke visible all over the north end? The one that destroyed the properties of several local businesses and forced more than 20 neighbours to evacuate their homes for a couple weeks? Remember how Halifax Fire deemed it as suspicious and turned the potential arson case over to police to investigate? The investigation concluded back in February due to lack of evidence, says Cst. Stacey Opalka with HRP. A lack of evidence probably shouldn't be surprising, given that the entire structure was obliterated.

7
So far just 170 people have completed the online survey from HRM about the future of the St. Patrick’s High School site on Quinpool Road, but that’s pretty damn good, says the city’s manager of urban design. “The content’s pretty interesting. This is not a standard ‘answer five questions in five minutes’ type of survey,” Jacob Ritchie tells Metro’s Haley Ryan. Residents can take the online survey until Friday.

8
“‘Completely unconcerned’ black bear spotted in Cambridge

“’It was completely unconcerned about anything. The neighbour’s garage was open, my garage was open; there was no indication of any interest. He just kept right on walking.’

Perry said the bear was mature, but it was hard to estimate it’s size.

‘It wasn’t a big fat bear, but it was a good adult bear.’”

9
Dalhousie University has spent nearly $650,000 because of the Class of 2015 DDS Gentlemen’s Facebook scandal. CBC’s Jennifer Henderson outlines some of the costs, including $244,669 on public relations experts, and $118,000 on outside legal help.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Tuesday's 7 things you have to read

Animals! Animals! Animals!

Posted By on Tue, Aug 11, 2015 at 1:40 PM

Sign up for some stand-up paddleboard yoga tonight in St. Margaret's Bay. - VIA INSTAGRAM.

1
Did you know The Coast’s homepage won’t accept swear words in headlines? We didn’t until trying to publish this Voice of the City by “asshole with a shovel” Paul Vienneau. The photographer and ice-destroyer was one of several voices whose input was sought, then ignored by the consultant report on what went wrong in municipal operations last winter. Vienneau has a lot to say on the subject.

2
Where there’s a Goodwill, there’s a way, reports (vacationing, stop writing please!) life editor Allison Saunders. Halifax’s first Goodwill thrift shop will be opening on Brownlow Avenue in Dartmouth. The 17,000 square-foot space will house a thrift store, an in-store cafe and a Goodwill Career Centre to help overcome barriers to employment. Great work, Saunders. Now get back to the beach.

3
Renowned for their psychic powers, groundhogs are also a growing problem for some HRM neighbourhoods. CBC’s Yvonne Colbert reports that calls about the fuzzy little guys have dramatically increased in the Hammonds Plains, Tantallon and Waverley-Fall River areas. They’ve burrowed into septic systems, tunnelled under driveways and eaten Sandy Balcom’s hostas. Still, as far as pests go, you could do worse for cuteness.

4
In other animal news, “Celebrity doe returns to NB community.”

Bella, a deer but “not a regular deer,” has found her way back to Juniper, New Brunswick after being relocated by wildlife officials. CTV reports that Bella is a regular visitor to the community, whose residents view her like a dog or “a mascot.”

“’Yesterday I arrived from my grocery shopping and my driveway was full of people to come to see Bella,’ she says. ‘We had people from Moncton, we had people from Fredericton.’

Not everyone, however, has been happy with Bella’s fame. She’s devoured gardens and frightened parents with small children.”

5
The Ecology Action Centre is disappointed with the province for cancelling Nova Scotia’s Community Feed-In Tariff program. The COMFIT energy program encouraged community-based renewable energy projects with a guaranteed rate per kilowatt-hour for whatever energy was fed back into the public electrical grid. But this week the government announced the project was being shut down because it was too successful.

“We are now at a point where the programme could begin to have a negative impact on power rates. Nova Scotians have told us they want stability and affordability when it comes to power rates, and industry wants clarity on the future of the Comfit programme,” reads a press release from the province.

The EAC’s energy coordinator Catherine Abreu writes in a statement released last night that the program’s exceeded expectations should be a cause for celebration, not cancellation.

“While pressing pause on any new applications makes sense until more renewable capacity can be affordably accommodated on Nova Scotia’s grid, ending the program outright is an unnecessary step backward.”

6
Members of Direct Action Everywhere—an international network of animal rights activists who call for total animal liberation—staged a protest inside the North Street Sobey’s meat section this week. The group held signs and loudly comments that “there is on way to humanely kill someone who does not want to die.”

Remember, eating chicken is morally worse than killing Cecil the lion. The “DxE” activists left peacefully after their protest, escorted by store security.

7
Can New Brunswick and Nova Scotia teach Maine a lesson about consolidation?

“In Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, economically moribund provinces that have been losing rural population for decades, provincial authorities forced many municipalities to merge – or “amalgamate,” in Canadian parlance – in the 1990s. Halifax effectively annexed sister cities Bedford and Dartmouth to form a metropolitan area of 400,000, half of Nova Scotia’s population and six times the size of Maine’s largest city, Portland. In New Brunswick, the eastern towns of Chatham and Newcastle – facing each other across a river – were melded with nine rural hamlets to forge the new city of Miramichi, while the border town of Edmundston, across the river from Madawaska, absorbed 11 rural neighbors. (Schools weren’t affected by the changes, as education is a provincial function in Canada.)

As in Maine, proponents of these and other 1990s mergers argued amalgamation would save money by eliminating redundant administrators, reducing the number of elected officials, and achieving economies of scale in both the purchase of infrastructure and the delivery of police, fire, trash collection and other services. Those who’ve studied or participated in the changes say it didn’t always turn out that way.”

Amalgamation may provide for some efficiencies, argues University of Victoria, British Columbia professor of public administration James McDavid, “but the argument falls off the rails when you’re dealing with functions involving human beings interacting with residents.”

McDavid studied the cost and quality of Halifax’s amalgamation on HRM’s police services. In the three years after 1996’s supercity was formed he found “higher costs (in real-dollar terms), lower numbers of sworn officers, lower service levels, no real change in crime rates, and higher workloads for sworn officers.”

Fine, but that was 1999. Over the last decade or so crime has dropped over 30 percent and the number of sworn officers has increased by six percent. So, who the hell really knows.

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Monday, August 10, 2015

Monday's 10 things to know

Campaign donations, Second Cup closures, and why you need to be at Reflections tonight.

Posted By on Mon, Aug 10, 2015 at 4:00 AM

Amanda Forrest, principal designer for The Marilyn Denis Show tours Grande Parade in the rain. - VIA INSTAGRAM.

1
The municipality’s in the weeds when it comes to grass cutting this summer. City editor Jacob Boon reports that “tens of thousands of dollars” in fines have been issued by HRM against its grass-cutting contractors over poor service this year. Back in May, Halifax tendered out several three-year contracts for grass cutting at a total price of roughly $3.5 million. Despite the poor performances and record number of calls for service, spokesperson Jennifer Stairs says cancelling any of those contracts is strictly a “last resort.”

2
Speaking of municipal government, today the Executive Standing Committee will discuss plans for campaign finance reform during municipal elections. Staff are recommending a bylaw which would establish new requirements for campaign contribution disclosures, as well as defining spending limits, maximum donations and contributor eligibility. Currently, candidates have to disclose to the public all contributions over $50, and no anonymous or third party contributions are permitted. Chris Bryant, senior advisor for the city on government relations and external affairs, highlights some blind spots worth addressing in today’s report. The new reforms potentially could include limiting contributions by corporations and trade unions, capping what candidates can spend during a campaign and regulating what candidates are allowed to do with surplus funds after the election. Any of these changes will first require the province to amend Halifax’s charter.

3
Also today at City Hall, should Halifax’s permanent residents to have the right to run for political office? Councillor Jennifer Watts wants a staff report looking into that very issue. The Peninsula North representative submitted a request for today’s Executive Standing Committee meeting asking staff for a report outlining “the implications of extending the right to nominate candidates or run for office in municipal elections to Permanent Residents.” The agenda item is “to respond to matters raised in correspondence from Minister Mark Furey” regarding Council’s proposal last December to work with the province in extending municipal voting rights to permanent residents (immigrants living and working in Canada who don’t hold citizenship). Granting someone the right to vote usually comes part and parcel with being able to run a campaign and be elected to office. But it appears the city, and the province, want to clarify those rules before moving forward.

4
Over at the Herald, Frances Willick takes part in 2015’s hottest trend: trying to decipher how Dalhousie University handles rape culture on campus. Willick used access to information laws to get a copy of investigation reports from both Dalhousie Security and Halifax police regarding the student-run “Dal Jungle” Instagram account that contained at least one sexually graphic image of a (possibly underage) student posted without her consent. The account was reported to Instagram in early November and deactivated shortly thereafter. Internal investigations by Dal led to “at least four students” being evicted from Howe Hall.

Dalhousie’s documents say that police received a verbal report on the case on November 13, and that security officer Jacob MacIsaac provided police with the names, dates of birth and contact information for the women on the page in case officers wanted to follow up. But the reports from HRP say the full names of the female students weren’t received until nearly six months later. By then, the women involved did not want police to investigate or for any charges to be laid.

“Dal spokeswoman Janet Bryson said. ‘It’s our understanding that HRP had confirmed there were no grounds for an investigation.’

But not having the names of the women would have hindered any potential investigation by police.

’Yes, you’re kind of left with, “OK, well where can I go?”’ Perrin said. ‘If I can’t speak to the people that were possibly victimized, how can I investigate it any further?’”

Dalhousie states they “fully cooperated” and shared the students’ names with the police in November. The cops “agree to disagree” with that statement, but don’t believe Dal acted to deliberately prevent an investigation.

5
The Second Cup on Quinpool Road has closed. Halifax ReTales reports the coffee franchise shut down Friday after three years of operation. The location made headlines back in 2013 when three employees were fired following a vote to unionize. Franchise owner Kathy Attis told the Nova Scotia Labour Board she cut her employees’ hours and fired the three baristas because labour costs were too high and sales were down, but the Board didn’t buy it. The lazy interpretation here is that union wages closed down a small business and workers should never demand to be treated fairly or they’ll all be out of work. But sales appear to have been dropping at the Quinpool Road location soon after it opened, and the three-year-old Second Cup was unionized for a longer period than it wasn’t. In any case, caffeine addicts that we are, The Coast laments the loss of another Halifax coffee shop.

6
A woman sitting in front of the Town Clock on Citadel Hill was robbed Saturday night. Police say the woman was approached by a couple at 9:50pm when the man demanded her money. No word yet if this non-violent incident will have an impact on Halifax’s vital ghost walk industry.

7
In more pressing crime news, police and health authorities are worried about the use of fentanyl in Nova Scotia. The synthetic opioid has been linked to several recent deaths in British Columbia and Saskatchewan, and Global’s Julia Wong reports RCMP are worried it’s heading east. Fentanyl-related deaths in the province have averaged at two a year since 2007, but the cops say they’ve been seeing more of the drug in 2015. Some of the uptake, Wong says, is from oil sands workers developing an addiction while out west (where the drug is more common) before returning to Nova Scotia.

8
Everyone hates the summer construction season, but expect plenty of smiles as work finally begins today on the long, long-delayed Hollis Street bike lane. The project will paint a two-foot wide strip on one side of the road, and move all parking metres to the other. Work is expected to take four weeks to complete, and the city says no road closures are expected.

9
The loss of Camille Strickland-Murphy, who died last week while serving a sentence at the Nova Institution for Women in Truro, is “like losing a limb” says her twin brother. Keir Strickland-Murphy tells CTV his sister—who struggled with mental illness—described the prison as a “living hell.” Most damningly, Keir says it was only after his sister took her own life that the family was informed she had made several previous attempts to harm herself. “I don’t believe the prison system as it stands is equipped to deal with people with mental illness,” he tells CTV.

+1 Sure Thing
Tonight, $Rockin' 4 Dollar$ turns 10 and you bet your sweet bippy it’s going to be a blowout. Join the party at Reflections with performances from The Cathartics, Future Girls, Moon, Tev Bembly, The Age, Designosaur, Rex Splode, Vicious, Vulva Culture, Primenine and Like A Motorcycle. Like the kids these days say, this one’s going to be epic. Psych yourself up for this Grand Guignol of punk pomp history with Lewis Rendell’s cover story on $Rockin’ 4 Dollar$ decade of debauchery.

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Friday, August 7, 2015

Friday's 8 things Stephen Harper doesn't want you to read

Debate debate; plus why is this man painting your nose?

Posted By on Fri, Aug 7, 2015 at 12:30 PM

Via a (since deleted) tweet by the Conservative Party's debate Twitter account.

1
Anyone who wasn’t watching Donald Trump or prepping for a fond farewell to Jon Stewart was probably live-tweeting last night’s leaders debate. In case you missed it, there’s plenty of coverage today from outlets regional, national and international. Seriously, lots and lots of coverage. As is his wont, Prime Monster Stephen Harper took no questions from reporters after the debate.

2
The largest Parapan Am Games ever kick off today in Toronto, bringing together 1,600 athletes who’ll be vying for a spots on the podium between now and August 15. One of those enviably talented individuals is Halifax’s Pam LeJean—a gold medal hopeful— who’ll throw down in both javelin and shot put events during the games. "I always want to be peaking. I always, even in practice, I want to always be at least at par with my last throw. I'm an asshole to myself,” she told The Coast back in January. Tune into her events on August 11 and 14. Sadly still absent from the Parapan Am Games? Rowing.

3
Wes Booth, 24, wants to “change the narrative” of Nova Scotia by putting blue paint on strangers’ noses. CBC reports on the Wolfville man’s grassroots social media campaign, while noting Booth is “currently unemployed and broke.” Related:

4
“You make them not a pokey-little vehicle stuck in a traffic jam, but the most efficient thing on the road and you can sell that to people. All of a sudden the bus—the transit, the loser cruiser, the loser's choice—starts to look like a pretty good idea.” Taras Grescoe spoke last night at the University of King’s College, but you can read his thoughts about public transit and Halifax’s future in an interview The Coast conducted right here.

5
Metro’s Zane Woodford gets a sneak peek at the renovations ongoing at the Metro Scotiabank Centre. New seats, bigger washrooms and improved concessions are all part of the plans now that banking giant Scotiabank is footing some of the bill. Because Halifax, donairs will also now be sold at the centre’s concessions booths (along with lobster rolls and sushi).

6
Gentrification continues in north end Halifax. Tenants in buildings owned by Harbour City Homes are worried they’re being forced out, after being informed the non-profit society is selling several of their properties on Brunswick Street. One resident, who’s lived in the neighbourhood her entire life, tells CBC the building next door was recently renovated and then rented out for double what she pays now. Evictions in everything but the name, these sorts of practices are one reason activists have called for Halifax to bring back rent control.

7
If you’re swinging by the Halifax Forum Farmers’ Market this Saturday, seek out Jessie Palmer’s table. She’s the English teacher and fermenter extraordinaire behind Cabbage Patch Kimchi, a relatively new, Halifax-made product. Kimchi pizza? Kimchi tacos? Kimchi Caesar? They could all be on this weekend’s menu.

8

Drown out tomorrow’s heavy rainfall warning with this week’s High 5: the thunder storm edition

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Thursday, August 6, 2015

Thursday's 8 things to read during these dog days of summer

Which debate are you watching tonight?

Posted By on Thu, Aug 6, 2015 at 4:00 AM

1
This coming Monday is a big deal for the Halifax music scene–– longtime music hub/incubator/rowdy drunken staple rocks us down memory lane in this week’s issue, so you have time to brush up on your history before the big bash.

2
Someone pretending to be Nicole, the victim in The Coast’s award-winning posted on the Halifax subreddit yesterday claiming (in character) that they were misrepresented by author Hilary Beaumont and actually had a tumultuous but loving relationship with the man who tried to proposition a stranger into raping his ex. Thankfully, the Reddit folk saw through this deception and called the author out on his (or maybe her, but probably his) bullshit.

3
Halifax’s exhibition industry is concerned about the closure of Exhibition Park. Trade show representatives today decried the impending closure of the facility, which the province says needs $9 million in upgrades (including $3 million in repairs from a tough winter). Management company Master Promotions Ltd. called on the local and provincial governments to find private sector partners to invest in the short-term planning of the building’s future.

4
“Sidney Crosby says hockey can’t be the only sport for kids: ‘change it up.’” Thanks Kid. Good advice.

5
Canada Post’s community mailboxes continue to be garbage, this time with a mailbox on Doyle Street left wide open after a letter carrier forgot to close it. A Canada Post spokesperson tells CBC it was all an “unfortunate mistake.” It’s here we bring up the NDP’s plan to bring back door-to-door mail only as a segue into…

6
It’s fight night on Parliament Hill! Tonight is the first federal leaders debate of this crazy, bloated, behemoth of a campaign. Expect plenty of spin and analysis on the performances of Stephen, Justin, Tom and Elizabeth. CBC is already anticipating the “non-verbal signals,” including game-changing election tells such as which way someone pivots. You can watch the debate live right here. Or find out where you can watch the more interesting and buffoonish Republican debate (i.e. Donald Trump) right here.

7
Adria Young went to Sackville, New Brunswick’s tenth annual Sappy Fest last week and it turned her into a big softie. Read up on some of the festival’s highlights, and check out some of her front row snap shots, here.

Plus 1 Sure Thing
Tonight downtown Dartmouth’s baby blue Bodega Boutique hosts the launch party for TNT Candles, a local line that’s handmade, all-natural and subtly scented. There’ll be drinks, snacks and loads of pretty things to light on fire.

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Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Wednesday's 10 you-gotta-read-this-nows

Sad beagles, smarter student loans, awesome Ellen Page.

Posted By on Wed, Aug 5, 2015 at 11:54 AM

Lightning it up! - VIA SHAWN_A_SHEARER ON INSTAGRAM.

1
Fourteen abandoned beagles are in need of new homes, reports Metro’s Rebecca Dingwell straight from the news page to my heart. The babies were taken from an East Hants property by the Nova Scotia SPCA Cruelty Investigations team, who say the dogs had been “left by themselves” for a couple of days with no sign anyone was coming back. The seven adult dogs have been medically assessed and are up for adoption now. The other puppies will have to grow a bit more before the SPCA finds them a forever home.

2
On the subject of people leaving behind things they don’t want, a family on Huck Finn Road in Hubley found a bunch of garbage and shit dumped on the access road to their house. A “small dump truck”’s worth of debris was discovered by the family Monday, none of it in clear bags.

3
Michaela Sam and the Canadian Federation of Students says Nova Scotia should follow Newfoundland’s lead and start offering student grants instead of loans. The Department of Labour and Advanced Education counters that converting all of Nova Scotia’s student loans to grants would come with a “significant” annual $18 million cost. Maybe, but I don’t know, $18 million a year actually seems pretty low for scrapping student loans. I mean, that’s like half a Nova Star.

4
Oh, speaking of the Nova Star, SPOILER ALERT: it’s on track for an “extremely disappointing” year. Nova Star Cruises has landed some winter work for the ferry—hauling passengers between England and France from November until May—but passenger numbers for July saw “almost no increase for the month” compared to the same period last year, says Michael Gorman with the Herald. Gorman quotes Transportation minister Geoff MacLellan saying “there’s certainly cause for concern and we’re not pleased whatsoever about what the numbers look like.”

5
COUNTERPOINT: Killing animals for fun is outrageous”

6
Transport Canada is recalling 3,000 BMW and Mini cars that had been parked at the Halifax port back in February. The past winter’s harsh weather means the cars may have been exposed to “excessive standing water and salt.” That would have created problems with the steering, and increased the risk of electrical fire.

7
Everyone’s favourite Ellen Page was on hand to celebrate Jamica’s first Pride event this past weekend. The Oscar-nominated actor from Halifax, who publicly came out last year, and other Pride attendees faced threats of violence over the festival that had Jamaica’s government calling for calm. Homosexuality is still illegal in the Caribbean country, but attitudes are evolving says Shaggy, the Jamaican singer and a person who should be quoted in every article. “At the end of the day, come on,” Mr. Boombastic implores. “That’s so old school and old fashioned right now. Come on, man, get over it.”

8
The Dutch Mason Blues Festival concerts that were scheduled to take place at Alderney Landing this weekend have been cancelled, not citing poor weather, but lackluster ticket sales. This year’s festival honouring the late blues legend was to be the first in Dartmouth, having been held at the Truro Raceway for the last ten years. Ticket holders looking for refunds or exchanges are being instructed to contact the Ticketpro Box Office.

9
Cut to the latest retail news—downtown Halifax’s dapper Sailor Bup’s Barbershop announced this morning via social media that it was expanding, opening a second location...in Dartmouth. If you notice around October 1 that the people of Pleasant Street are suddenly looking slicker than ever, that’s why.

+1 Sure Thing
A Halifax supergroup if there ever was one, Aqua Alta is the pet project of Jenn Grant, Charles Austin and Graeme Campbell. Currently touring the festival scene in support of their unbelievably ethereal debut album Dreamsphere, this show is their only hometown show of the summer and the first since the album’s release.

In case you were late to this video coming out yesterday, that’s totally fine, because it’s about buses being late.

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Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Tuesday's 6 things you need to know

Long weekend recovery, and election coverage, starts here.

Posted By on Tue, Aug 4, 2015 at 2:37 PM

Even without a new coat of paint on his hat, Theodore Tugboat has a smile on his face. - VIA LCWARD1988 ON INSTAGRAM
  • Even without a new coat of paint on his hat, Theodore Tugboat has a smile on his face.
  • via lcward1988 on Instagram

1
Today city council votes on the proposed pilot project for Halifax’s first mobile food market, which was green-lighted for a staff feasibility report back in June. Yes, a market on wheels, aimed at making fresh, healthy food accessible to the city’s driest food deserts. Those wheels would belong to a Halifax Transit bus—which the project would use for cruising with a bus load of fruit and veggies one day a week, for 21 weeks, making hour-and-a-half stops in neighbourhoods identified as high need. Getting that bus is the most important piece of the puzzle though, and today’s vote determines whether a request for a one-time, in-kind donation of it is a go.

2
Speaking of getting a Halifax Transit bus, raise your hand if you’re annoyed about how the buses are always late. Wow, that is a lot of you. So you’ll be happy to know—oh, hey, you can put your hand down now—you’ll be happy that we’ve done a whole video looking at the late bus issue. The good news is that the day our PLANifax collaborators studied the Route 1 bus, it was only late seven percent of the time. The bad news is Halifax Transit considers a bus “on time” if it leaves up to three minutes before its scheduled time, or up to three minutes after. Watch the video (it’s also at the bottom of this page) for lots more bus info. And charts!!

3
Some members of Team Coast got away from it all this holiday weekend, leaving behind concerns about “news” and “the world” and devious old Stephen Harper. Luckily other, better Coasters were ready for anything, including a federal election. Jacob Boon kicked off our “Campaign and Suffering” election coverage early this morning with this look at the candidates in Halifax’s main ridings. Lots more to come between now and the October 19 election that is both snap—in that it’s apparently so urgent it had to be called on the Sunday of the long weekend— and anachronistically slow. As in the longest campaign since 1872 slow. Whether you’re with the conspiracy theorists who think Harper is gaming the election spending rules with the long campaign, or are on the side of science and understand the recent near-earth asteroid flyby disrupted communications from Harper’s home planet and lead to confusion about the preferred date, we will have you covered.

4
The New Jersey based Journal of Commerce is reporting that business coming via the Suez Canal may mean “a new lease on life” for the Port of Halifax. Yesterday a giant boat called the Vivaldi became the largest container ship to ever come to Halifax, and in a few days the even-bigger Budapest Express will top it.

“It’s a very positive sign. I think we are seeing the turn of the corner,” said Karen Oldfield,” president and CEO of the Halifax Port Authority. “The day of the big ship is here.”

5
In other shipping news, Theodore Tugboat’s new hat is delayed. The TV-show-themed-tugboat-turned-tourism icon’s fading orange cap was supposed to be painted this morning by a volunteer crew of firefighters—volunteer painters, professional firefighters—but the damp weather isn’t a friend to the marine paint. Or, apparently, children. The folks at Murphy’s the Cable Wharf, where Theodore spends his time, will reschedule the painting event. In the meantime, Theodore is still welcoming visitors but he would appreciate it if you could refrain from teasing him with the “Do you like my hat?” line from P.D. Eastman’s classic Go, Dog. Go!

+1 Sure Thing
Peterborough’s The Lonely Parade roll into town for an all-ages show, days after releasing a teeny tiny split EP with tour pals Beef Boys for their joint Rolling Dog Show 2008 east coast tour. With song titles like “Stephane Dion,” “My Mom Got Hit on at a Punk Show” and “Depressing Song,” The Lonely Parade are tack-sharp and topical, but keep it weird and funky with DIY charm.

Why are the buses late? Watch and learn—this video is way more entertaining than waiting for a bus.

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Friday, July 31, 2015

Friday's 8 things to read now before the long weekend

Nipples, lobsters, dildos and microbeads.

Posted By on Fri, Jul 31, 2015 at 11:32 AM

VIA ACORN_ART_PHOTOGRAPHY  ON INSTAGRAM.

1
Andrea Gunn at the Herald takes a look into the campaign war chests of Nova Scotia’s candidates in the soon-to-be-announced federal election. Incumbent Geoff Regan and the Halifax West Liberal Association have the richest bankroll ($147,452), followed by the Central Nova Conservative Association ($124,588) of outgoing Justice Minister Peter MacKay (who will be a good little boy and go where he’s told during the election). The Halifax Liberal Association (who will be looking to elect Andy Fillmore over NDP incumbent Megan Leslie) has the fourth-highest account ($91,864).

2
Speaking of Megan Leslie, her efforts to ban microbeads appear to have paid off.

3
Mother’s Pizza’s Tyson Wachter and Dharma Sushi’s Ami Goto have put their good tastes together to bring you Full Moon Izakaya. It’s a monthly Japanese-style pup pop-up, bringing small snacks and sake to the table. As you may have guessed from its name, Full Moon takes place the Saturday closest to the full moon—the first installment being tomorrow. Melissa Buote chatted with Wachter and Goto about the project, and the Saturday’s five-course menu, and DAMN it sounds good.

4
“Judge quashes Charter complaint over Halifax police posing with dildo.” Jessica Flower gets all the fun stories.

5
Aside from wondering where the heck all of HRM’s drinking fountains have gone, Lezlie Lowe also wants to #FreeTheNipple. Lowe’s column in today’s Herald relates the story of the Waterloo, Ont. Mohamed sisters, who were recently stopped by police for riding their bikes topless. The sisters have lodged a complaint (toplessness isn’t illegal in Ontario), and a planning a rally for this weekend. Writes Lowe:

“I’m all for the rally. But what will really make a difference—what will work more to desexualize women’s breasts—is more everyday toplessness.

I’m talking walking the dog, picking up the mail from the community super box, depositing your paycheque at the ATM. If it’s sticky out and you’d feel cooler without a shirt, go for it. Seeing breasts in magazines? Doesn’t count. I’m looking for reality. Lopsided. The odd hair…The more breasts are boring, the more they are peripheral to people’s everyday experience, the less their arrival feels like the start of a porn film. And the less women’s bodies will matter. The less women will be sexualized.”

6
Buzzfeed looks into the Isle Madame “murder for lobster” story and concludes that probably no one was actually murdered for lobster. It’s a long read but full of the kind of colourful malapropisms (“Benadryl” for “adrenaline”) that makes one homesick for Cape Breton.

+1 Sure Thing
Calgary punks La Luna fucking rip. Thrashing, violent guitar and drums pave the way for wailing, desperate vocals that make their short songs feel like quick shots of adrenaline straight to the chest. Catch them tonight with Weed Thief, Kings Girls, heiße and Geil.

———

+1 bonus long weekend gif party
Everyone you know is leaving work early to get to SappyFest, so that’s all for today. Bye. So long. Enjoy the three-day weekend. See you Monday.

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Thursday, July 30, 2015

Thursday has 9 things it needs to talk with you about

Exhibition Park is closing, but Pizza Corner is getting donairs.

Posted By on Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 4:02 PM

Reflect on how nice the day is. - VIA ANGÈLE BELLIVEAU ON INSTAGRAM.

1
Slide The City has officially cancelled any plans of coming to Halifax. The giant water slide people say in a statement they haven’t been able to find an alternate location after not clearing Citadel Hill (which they originally announced for their summertime bacchanal). “The good news is that all the crunches, plucking and ‘man'scaping you were doing to have your summer body ready have not been in vain—you look great!” The company says it will issue refunds, and plans to try again next year.

2
The winter of no fun has claimed one last victim: Exhibition Park. The provincial Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal is permanently closing the 30-year-old facility, which received heavy damage over the last winter. CBC reports the building would need $3 million in repairs and another $6 million in upgrades to maintain public safety. This year’s Maritime Fall Fair is also cancelled. Sorry, Exhibitionists.

3
Health Canada has approved the RU-486 abortion pill for use in Canada. The application for the pill has been before Health Canada since 2012, National Abortion Federation president Vicki Saporta tells CBC, “so it is long overdue that they approve this very safe and effective method of early abortion care that millions of women around the world have been able to access since 1988.” Some countries allow the drug—which will be sold under the brand name MIfegymiso—to be dispensed by pharmacists, but women in Canada will still need a prescription from a doctor to purchase the drug.

4
Halifax Shipping News reports the barges to be used in the Big Lift have arrived in the harbour. The Ocean Arctique tug tandem towed in the barges—named abys and timberland (barges traditionally have cool street names that make them sound tough, according to Maritime custom). The floating platforms will be used for segments of the Macdonald Bridge being removed and lowered down to the water, as well as carrying the replacement sections to be installed over the next year.

5
Today we raise a tiny cup of donair sauce to Johnny K’s Donair—the joint venture between Mezza Lebanese Cuisine’s Nahas brothers and HFX Sports Bar’s Marcel Khoury celebrates its soft opening today on the legendary Pizza Corner. Tonight and Friday, Johnny’s will be serving authentic donairs from 7pm-midnight, with regular hours (11am-5am) and a full menu kicking off Saturday.

6
Neville MacKay also welcomes you to check out his brand new space today. The sweet scents of My Mother’s Bloomers will no longer fill the air of Spring Garden Place mall—but you won’t have to go too far to find them. Bloomers now calls the iconic 5486 Spring Garden Road (the former Mills building) home.

7
Independent Living Nova Scotia’s fourth annual Art of Disability Festival kicked off this morning at Dartmouth’s Alderney Landing, bringing artists, performers and craftspeople together for a one-day event. "I think there are some people who might be hesitant of talking to, you know, people with disabilities," explains coordinator Nicole McDonald. "So, by them coming to this event, it gives them a great opportunity to interact with us and see for themselves that we have talents and we can just be like anybody else in the community."

8
You officially have less than 48 hours to exercise your right to vote in this year’s big, badass Best of Halifax readers’ poll. Show your favourite DJ/filmmaker/craft brewer/salon/Twitterer how much you care with a couple of clicks, and you could win a Halifax prize pack. Vote here, and we won’t bug you to do so again until next year.

+1 Sure Thing
Western Canadian Music Award Winners Sweet Alibi are a soul/folk/country trio, touring across the country ahead of their upcoming release Walking in the Dark and they’re playing The Company House tonight. The trio haven’t released an album since 2013’s We’ve Got To, but if their past releases are any indication, what’s to come will be explosive. Sweet Alibi soar with stirring harmonies and tight, twangy guitar riffs. Think Adele if she were a scorned Winnipegger.

Fireworks fans, consider spending your Natal Day with The Bandit (from our "Bang for your buck" look at local firework options).

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Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Wednesday's 10 things to read about

Condo fuckery, Sid the Kid's double-double and Halifax Pop Explosion's big news

Posted By on Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 12:19 PM

VIA GARY ARCHIBALD ON INSTAGRAM

1
Well this is a bit of monstrous bullshit: a condo development has built a wall over the basketball courts used by neighbouring St. Joseph’s A McKay School. CBC’s Brett Ruskin took some photos and looked into the obnoxious wall, put up by Louis Lawen’s Dexel Developments. Originally, Dexel was to provide a new playground space, but the new strip of land was owned by HRM and got bogged down in bureaucratic red tape. The basketball nets and nearby playground, Ruskin notes, were built following three years of penny drives, fundraising events and grant applications.

CREDIT: BRETT RUSKIN, CBC
  • CREDIT: Brett Ruskin, CBC

2
Your little brother’s favourite hacktivist group, Anonymous, plans to keep releasing top secret government documents until Canada arrests the RCMP officers responsible for the death of a protester in British Columbia. Items already leaked to the press appear to include details on the country’s foreign spying operations, including 21 CSIS bureaus around the world that have never been publicly acknowledged until now. Vice Canada’s Justin Ling and Alex Cybulski have more here, that’s well worth a read.

3
“Halifax man seriously injured after someone jumped on his head several times.

4
Sidney Crosby and Nathan MacKinnon worked a shift at Tim Hortons because Canada. It was all part of a television commercial shoot for the Burger King subsidiary. Probably one of those cool commercials where a fun prank happens and real people like you or I are taken by surprise at the great taste of dark roast. Crosby suffered a walnut con-crunchion on set and will be out for four to six weeks.

5
For the second time this year, an inmate at the Nova Institution for Women in Truro has died. Prison, even in Canada, can be a death sentence.

6
The labour dispute between Egg Films and the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees continues to be sad and petty. Duel protests by union members outside Egg and by Egg employees outside the Westin (where IATSE was having a national board meeting) occurred yesterday and featured professional conduct like hurling insults and calling the cops. In recent weeks, both sides have created social media accounts to anonymously trash the other and decried their opponents for bullying. Egg locked out its unionized film technicians back in March, after years of fighting against unionization with the Nova Scotia Labour Board and in the courts. Egg’s owners (Sara Thomas and Mike Hachey) claim the union failed to negotiate a contract that would work for Egg—a company trying to survive in a difficult Nova Scotia film climate.

7
Though October seems like an eternity away, the Halifax Pop Explosion's initial lineup for the 2015 festival was announced last night at The Company House. Purity Ring, Kanye collaborator Travi$ Scott, festival alumni Stars and mathcore scene vets The Dillinger Escape Plan are among the headliners.

Check out the initial lineup here and then grab your early bird passes before they're gone.

8
As of 20 minutes ago, Greg Nash and Andrew Murphy's mild mannered North Street brewery, Unfiltered Brewing, is officially fucking open. Hop to it, boozehounds.

9
Fantasie Music, Spring Garden’s Road’s latest retail arrival, opened to the public last weekend, bringing Chinese-made stringed instruments—pianos, guitars, violins and the sort— as well as private music lessons to the downtown shopping scene. It’s a family-run business and a bright storefront (a welcoming spot for impromptu jam sessions) with lots of plans for the future.

+1 Sure Thing
One of the most hyped shows of the summer, Victoria’s groovy and ambient Freak Heat Waves make their way to Gus' tonight with Toronto’s transcendentally cool New Fries. Locals Old & Weird and Moon round out the bill, the show being Moon’s last set with their current lineup.

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Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Tuesday's 6 things you'd better know by now

Kids in the kitchens, garbage baggage and Halifax Water buries daylighting report

Posted By on Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 4:48 PM

VIA SHAWN A. SHEARER ON INSTAGRAM.

1
Summer means no school and little political action, so crime is continuing to dominate the headlines. Police are looking for someone who b by pouring hot water on him. The cops have also pressed charges against a 20-year-old man who stabbed another male then politely drove his victim to the hospital.

2
Good on Brett Bundale and the Herald for obtaining a copy of a long-rumoured engineering report that appears to contradict Halifax Water’s position on daylighting the Sawmill River. The CBCL Ltd. report has been in the water utility’s hands since (in rough draft form) since last April, and recommends a box culvert and open channel to replace aging pipe under the river (and in the process, daylight parts of the river). Halifax Water has repeatedly said daylighting Sawmill is too expensive and difficult to do. Spokesperson James Campbell splits hairs with Bundale, saying there’s a difference between naturalized daylighting and an engineered open channel. “Creating an open channel,” Bundale writes, quoting the report, “is commonly referred to as ‘daylighting.’”

3
Tiffany Chase of HRM tells Metro’s Stephanie Taylor that residents expecting some leeway on the new garbage rules coming into effect on Saturday should think again. If that clear bag garbage isn’t properly sorted, b. Yesterday, we price checked some clear bag options around town, but today’s news has me thinking some enterprising hauler should start his own off-the-books household service. Don’t want to go through and separate the trash HRM won’t take? Pay $25 and some dude in a pick-up truck will swing by for your garbage. After all, despite all these garbage changes, it’s industrial and commercial waste hauling (including from residences like apartment buildings) that make up the bulk of unsorted materials in our dump. If you’re still unclear on the city’s new garbage rules, there’s an app for that.

4
Speaking of garbage, The Amazing Race Canada will air an episode this Wednesday where contestant teams run around Halifax doing Halifax things in Halifax places. That includes common activities that you and I do every weekend, like racing through the new Central Library, climbing to the top of the Macdonald bridge and “carrying kegs down Barrington Street.” Teams will also dive for lobsters in Dalhousie University’s Aquatron Laboratory, which Amazing Race supervising producer Mark Lysakowski says is “the coolest thing known to man.”

5
Nova Scotia’s short on kitchen staff, reports CBC. “There just simply is no pool of chefs out there,” said Gordon Stewart of the Restaurant Association of Nova Scotia. Stewart claims the province will be short 1,500 kitchen staff in the next several years. As pointed out last night by some readers, the article doesn’t really mention that getting yelled at and sexually harassed for a low-paying job in a stupid-hot kitchen maybe isn’t the most attractive work these days for young people. If you’ve got a kitchen horror story on why you left the restaurant business, we’d love to hear from you.

+1 Sure Thing
There’s a cross-country affair tonight at The Khyber with Victoria’s Freak Heat Waves, Toronto’s Crosss, Montreal’s Special Noise and Truro’s No Problem.

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Monday, July 27, 2015

Monday's 8 things you need to know

Waffles, clear bags and Halifax Water's expensive lockout.

Posted By on Mon, Jul 27, 2015 at 4:45 PM

It's not easy being green paint on Argyle Street's argyle-painted pattern. - VIA TIM KROCHAK
  • It's not easy being green paint on Argyle Street's argyle-painted pattern.
  • via Tim Krochak

1
Rain. It has one thing going for it—the whole providing-life-giving-water deal—but otherwise needs some serious help in the image department. From the way it blocks the sun, to how uncomfortable it is to encounter, rain sucks. And it’s not making any friends by ruining Argyle Street’s nice new paint job. The city’s pilot project to make the street awesome again includes an argyle pattern decoration for the road itself, but the rain must have gotten jealous and used some of its acid rain to obliterate the paint. Or else that green river is just annoying residue. Anyway, perhaps next time around the city should consider paint that is designed to resist rain’s destructive tantrums, such as this stuff.

2
In case you missed the pop-up waffle frenzy last week—meet The Chameleon, a place for experiential marketing and imaginative special events. It’ll host We Dream of Waffles—a nighttime waffle restaurant—for two days next weekend, serving all of you Leslie Knopes off their creative menu, as well as helping to support Nourish Nova Scotia.

3
Starting Saturday the city will require any garbage bag you put out (past your first one) to be clear. Where should you stock up on the newly-required household item? The Coast went shopping around the HRM to find the best deal on clear garbage bags. The results may surprise you.

4
That two-month lockout of Halifax Water workers cost the utility $2 million in private security. CBC’s Bob Murphy requested the bills, which outline $724,000 spent on wages for private security staff in the first month alone. Water spokesperson Jim Vibert defends the costs as “reasonable when you consider it provided security for the water system—a very, very large water system—for about a third of the population of this province as well as wastewater treatment facilities.”

5
“Nova Scotia woman who brandished dagger, kneed officers in groin, found not criminally responsible.”

6
Councillor Darren Fisher says a crop of group homes have “proliferated” in Dartmouth, causing neighbours to complain to him about how it may “drastically change the composition of a neighbourhood.” The Liberal candidate in this fall’s federal election plans to ask for a staff report looking into limiting the amount of group homes permitted in one area. Fisher admits to Metro’s Stephanie Taylor he doesn’t really know the specifics of the homes, including “whether they serviced young people, individuals with disabilities or otherwise.” In related news, Michael Tutton of the Canadian Press says weapons cases in Nova Scotia group homes for youth are on the rise. Don’t worry though, because violent crime is still decreasing in Canada. Meanwhile, municipal councillors in Nova Scotia are facing 36 criminal charges (including 28 charges related to fraud).

7
Irvine Carvery has announced he’ll step down this fall as president of the Africville Genealogy Society. Carvery will leave his position after 28 years on the job (aside from a two-year break from 1995 to 1997).

+1 Sure Thing
Tell this stupid rainy day to shove it while you shovel your face full of popcorn and enjoy some knee-slappers courtesy of Amy Schumer. Our resident Marvel-hating movie buff Tara Thorne saw Trainwreck last week and calls it another dimension to an exciting performer.

”Dear Wildpinklers: beware…it’s Peeback Time.”


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