In Bloom 

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Ikebana owner Ferdinand Ballesteros describes this table piece as a “no-frills arrangement” of accordion leaves and calla lilies, but the beauty is in that absence of frill. “Ikebana” refers to the Japanese art of flower arrangement, and if what you’re looking for is simplicity and elegance for a ceremony or reception area, keep it in mind.

“Ikebana is like haute couture,” explains Ballesteros. “Each one is made with only one particular intent. In your wedding reception, each arrangement will be created specifically for the space intended, with everything like wall colour, tablecloth colour, space limits, et cetera taken into consideration.”

Lilies continue to reign queen in this traditional bouquet, designed by Tracy Garner of Dean’s Flowers. When deciding on whether to go for a more formal piece such as this one, Holly Winchester, owner of Dean’s Flowers, suggests that “a bride should be sure to allow for a healthy floral budget, because this design uses significantly more flowers and greenery and is more labour intensive than a less formal, hand-tied bouquet design.”
photo Julé Malet-Veale
This modern twist on a classic cascade bouquet offers a light, fun alternative. Designed by Neville Mackay, owner of My Mother’s Bloomers, the hand-tied piece uses calla lilies, gerber daisies, dendrobium orchids, green tea roses and hyprericum berries. “By grouping each type of flower, it makes for more visual impact from a monochromatic bouquet,” says Mackay. “The bear grass in the cascade and looped within the bouquet adds fluidity and movement, and the addition of embedded jewels gives the bling factor many brides are looking for.”
photo Bethany MacIsaac Photography
This romantic rose bouquet was designed by Marie’s Flowers Ltd.
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Ikebana owner Ferdinand Ballesteros describes this table piece as a “no-frills arrangement” of accordion leaves and calla lilies, but the beauty is in that absence of frill. “Ikebana” refers to the Japanese art of flower arrangement, and if what you’re looking for is simplicity and elegance for a ceremony or reception area, keep it in mind.

“Ikebana is like haute couture,” explains Ballesteros. “Each one is made with only one particular intent. In your wedding reception, each arrangement will be created specifically for the space intended, with everything like wall colour, tablecloth colour, space limits, et cetera taken into consideration.”

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