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Letters to the editor, November 14, 2013

These are the letters and comments from the print edition

2 comments

Public art dismay
I was dismayed by Jane Kansas's op-ed rant about "North is Freedom," a public sculpture created by Doug Bamford, and installed in Halifax ("The monument at the north end library is a mess," Voice of the City, November 7). She chose to write a violent, unfocused, art-hating diatribe instead of making the effort to write an insightful critique. Worse still, she gives support

to the widely held prejudice that "all public art is expensive rubbish and why do we need it anyway!"

Her kind of literary vitriol belongs on an extremist blog site. The Coast should be taking a more active editorial role. It should not be a soapbox for every unhappy person who happens to be having a bad day.

John Brett, Halifax


On Griffin's Pond
Upset about your ignorance regarding the history of Griffin's Pond in the Halifax Public Gardens (Best of Halifax, Feature, November 7)? Don't despair: The Friends of the Public Gardens

have the answer to this and all the other burning questions you may have about the Gardens!

We have just released the second edition of our book, The Halifax Public Gardens, which is full of beautiful photos and historical information AND

contains a detailed map of all the plantings in the Gardens. You can get this book from halifaxpublicgardens.ca, at Bookmark or tax-free from us at the Seaport Market during December. The history of Griffin's Pond, incidentally, is on page 74...

Sophie Bieger, vice-chair of The Friends of the Public Gardens


Bad Grandpa good
Your review of Bad Grandpa perfectly illustrates why when god wants to give the world an enema, he'll stick it in Halifax (Movie Reviews by Jacob Boon, November 7). The film has received excellent reviews in all major urban centres in Canada and the USA. At the screening I saw, people were in hysterics.

I suggest your reviewer snort some Liquid Plumr and get with the tour. Movies such as Bad Grandpa should be celebrated, not denigrated. —Paul Mandell, via email


Between the lines

The Crosswalk Avenger is wasting his time with this---the city is absolutely right ("Crosswalks avenged," Reality Bites by Hilary Beaumont, November 7).

The Avenger's assertion that there is no such thing as a rolling stop is completely incorrect; I'd say about 90 percent of stops (not at red lights) are rolling stops. If you watch all motorists' stops at stop signs, or right hands at red lights, you'll see this to be true.

I have nothing against a rolling stop, but there is risk associated with them and differing circumstances need to be addressed in each situation. Also, rolling at one kilometre and rolling at 10 kilometres have very different dynamics.

I don't know why pedestrians don't get it. They have everything to lose. It's so simple. They need to make eye contact with every driver they are considering to step in front of and they need to ensure said driver is making a complete stop.

Do these two simple acts and you will not get hit. It's so simple. Lines will not help---exercising safe crossing practices will! —posted by Smee at thecoast.ca In the case of the Avenger, he did all that, and more. Still got hit. Not sure what was going through the driver's mind when she saw this man make eye contact with her and put his arm out to cross, but she evidently didn't clue in that he was crossing.

I get tired of drivers blaming pedestrians and pedestrians blaming drivers. It's the responsibility of both to be paying attention. Drivers need to be aware of their surroundings all the time, and pedestrians need to stop and look where they're crossing. To me, that's what is "simple." —posted by TDF

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