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Listen to this: Laura Roy's "Halifax"

London's biggest R&B star-on-the-rise shouts out her hometown with a stripped-back new single.

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"You cant just move back to a city and everything will be fine," says Roy. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Submitted photo
  • "You cant just move back to a city and everything will be fine," says Roy.
Laura Roy doesn’t miss home. The R&B superstar-on-the-rise has been too busy making London her city to think much about Halifax: This much is clear when she answers the phone to chat about her new single while simultaneously piling in the van for the next tour stop, supporting Anne-Marie (a sort of British Carly Rae Jepsen with over 25,090,000 monthly listeners on Spotify).

Singing backing for Anne-Marie is the sort of thing Roy dreamed of when she left Halifax (well, the waterfront campus of NSCC in Dartmouth if we want to be specific) for Toronto, the city everyone told her she needed to move to to make it. Her music, meanwhile, a slick unspooling of R&B-drenched pop, is synth-baked enough to make anywhere feel like a dance floor and feels decidedly more UK than TO—making her jump across the Atlantic make sense.

But, as she spends time recording a new EP, Roy—who grew up in Canning, Nova Scotia— is taking a break from her Lianne La Havas-influenced brand of lovelorn dance music to drop a “new, stripped back” single, called “Halifax.”

The song was recorded as “just a one-take in my living room, very intimate. It was about a relationship, but the idea of attaching to places or things when you have to let go to be able to move forward and grow. You cant just move back to a city and everything will be fine,” says Roy.

She’s excited for this rainy afternoon anthem, adding: “My last couple of releases were quite stripped back. I think people enjoy that because you can really hear my voice and music. People back home know me for that. There’s a focus on the actual song and putting something out that’s raw and personal.”

And while “Halifax” brings to mind the old adage that you can never go home again, Roy also hopes this song will prove to be more than just an ear worm: “I really want people to feel something, to listen to music and feel connected to it.”

See (er, listen) for yourself:


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